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FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

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INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR PROGRAF

PROGRAF® (tacrolimus) injection

PROGRAF® (tacrolimus) capsules

PROGRAF® Granules (tacrolimus for oral suspension)


INDICATION


PROGRAF is indicated for the prophylaxis of organ rejection, in patients receiving allogeneic kidney transplant, liver transplants, and heart transplant, in combination with other immunosuppressants.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING — MALIGNANCIES AND SERIOUS INFECTIONS IN TRANSPLANT PATIENTS
See full prescribing information for complete boxed warning.

  • Increased risk for developing serious infections and malignancies with PROGRAF or other immunosuppressants that may lead to hospitalization or death.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

PROGRAF is contraindicated in patients with a hypersensitivity to tacrolimus. PROGRAF injection is contraindicated in patients with a hypersensitivity to HCO-60 (polyoxyl 60 hydrogenated castor oil).

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Lymphomas and Other Malignancies

Patients receiving immunosuppressants, including PROGRAF, are at increased risk of developing lymphomas and other malignancies, particularly of the skin. As usual for patients with increased risk for skin cancer, exposure to sunlight and UV light should be limited by wearing protective clothing and using a sunscreen with a high protection factor. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) has been reported in immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients. The risk of PTLD appears greatest in those individuals who are Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) seronegative, a population that includes many young children.

Serious Infections

Patients receiving immunosuppressants, including PROGRAF, are at increased risk of developing bacterial, viral, fungal, and protozoal infections, including opportunistic infections. These infections may lead to serious, including fatal, outcomes. Serious viral infections reported include:

  • Polyoma virus-associated nephropathy (PVAN), mostly due to BK virus infection
  • JC virus-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)
  • Cytomegalovirus infections: CMV seronegative transplant patients who receive an organ from a CMV seropositive donor disease are at higher risk of developing CMV viremia and CMV disease.

Monitor for the development of infection and adjust the immunosuppressive regimen to balance the risk of rejection with the risk of infection.

Not Interchangeable With Extended-Release Tacrolimus Products - Medication Errors

Medication errors, including substitution and dispensing errors, between tacrolimus immediate-release products and tacrolimus extended-release products were reported outside the U.S. This led to serious adverse reactions, including graft rejection, or other adverse reactions due to under- or over-exposure to tacrolimus. PROGRAF is not interchangeable or substitutable with tacrolimus extended-release products. Instruct patients and caregivers to recognize the appearance of PROGRAF dosage forms.

New Onset Diabetes After Transplant

PROGRAF was shown to cause new onset diabetes mellitus in clinical trials of kidney, liver, and heart transplantation. New onset diabetes after transplantation may be reversible in some patients. African-American and Hispanic kidney transplant patients are at an increased risk. Blood glucose concentrations should be monitored closely in patients using PROGRAF.

Nephrotoxicity

PROGRAF, like other calcineurin-inhibitors, can cause acute or chronic nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity was reported in clinical trials. Consider dosage reduction in patients with elevated serum creatinine and tacrolimus whole blood trough concentrations greater than the recommended range. The risk for nephrotoxicity may increase when PROGRAF is concomitantly administered with CYP3A inhibitors (by increasing tacrolimus whole blood concentrations) or drugs associated with nephrotoxicity (e.g., aminoglycosides, ganciclovir, amphotericin B, cisplatin, nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors). Monitor renal function and consider dosage reduction if nephrotoxicity occurs.

Neurotoxicity

PROGRAF may cause a spectrum of neurotoxicities. The most severe neurotoxicities include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), delirium, seizure and coma. Others include tremors, paresthesias, headache, mental status changes, and changes in motor and sensory functions. As symptoms may be associated with tacrolimus whole blood trough concentrations at or above the recommended range, monitor for neurologic symptoms and consider dosage reduction or discontinuation of PROGRAF if neurotoxicity occurs.

Hyperkalemia

Hyperkalemia has been reported with PROGRAF use. Serum potassium levels should be monitored. Careful consideration should be given prior to use of other agents also associated with hyperkalemia.

Hypertension

Hypertension is a common adverse effect of PROGRAF therapy and may require antihypertensive therapy. Careful consideration should be given prior to use of antihypertensive agents associated with hyperkalemia (e.g., potassium-sparing diuretics, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers). Calcium-channel blocking agents may increase tacrolimus blood concentrations and therefore require dosage reduction of PROGRAF.

Anaphylactic Reactions

Anaphylactic reactions have occurred with injectables containing castor oil derivatives, including IV PROGRAF. PROGRAF injection should be reserved for patients who are unable to take PROGRAF orally. Monitor patients for anaphylaxis when using the intravenous route of administration.

Not Recommended for Use with Sirolimus

PROGRAF is not recommended for use with sirolimus:

  • The use of sirolimus with PROGRAF in studies of de novo liver transplant patients was associated with an excess mortality, graft loss, and hepatic artery thrombosis, and is not recommended.
  • The use of sirolimus (2 mg per day) with PROGRAF in heart transplant patients in a U.S. study was associated with increased risk of renal function impairment, wound healing complications, and insulin-dependent post-transplant diabetes mellitus, and is not recommended.

Interactions with CYP3A Inhibitors and Inducers

When coadministering PROGRAF with strong CYP3A4-inhibitors (e.g., telaprevir, boceprevir, ritonavir, ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, clarithromycin) and strong inducers (e.g., rifampin, rifabutin) adjustments in the dosing regimen of PROGRAF and subsequent frequent monitoring of tacrolimus whole blood trough concentrations and tacrolimus-associated adverse reactions are recommended.

QT Prolongation

PROGRAF may prolong the QT/QTc interval and may cause Torsade de Pointes. Avoid PROGRAF in patients with congenital long QT prolongation syndrome. In patients with congestive heart failure, bradyarrhythmias, those taking certain antiarrhythmic medications or other medicinal products that lead to QT prolongation, and those with electrolyte disturbances such as hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or hypomagnesemia, consider obtaining electrocardiograms and monitoring electrolytes (magnesium, potassium, calcium) periodically during treatment. When coadministering PROGRAF with other substrates and/or inhibitors of CYP3A4 that also have the potential to prolong the QT interval, a reduction in PROGRAF dose, frequent monitoring of tacrolimus whole blood concentrations, and monitoring for QT prolongation is recommended. Use of PROGRAF with amiodarone has been reported to result in increased tacrolimus whole blood concentrations with or without concurrent QT prolongation.

Myocardial hypertrophy

Myocardial hypertrophy has been reported in infants, children, and adults, particularly those with high tacrolimus trough concentrations. This condition appears reversible in most cases following dose reduction or discontinuance of therapy. In patients who develop renal failure or clinical manifestations of ventricular dysfunction while receiving PROGRAF therapy, echocardiographic evaluation should be considered. If myocardial hypertrophy is diagnosed, dosage reduction or discontinuation of PROGRAF should be considered.

Immunizations

The use of live vaccines should be avoided during treatment with tacrolimus; examples include (not limited to) the following: intranasal influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, oral polio, BCG, yellow fever, varicella, and TY21a typhoid vaccines.

Pure Red Cell Aplasia

Cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported in patients treated with tacrolimus. If PRCA is diagnosed, discontinuation of PROGRAF should be considered.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Kidney Transplant: The most common adverse reactions (≥ 30%) were infection, tremor, hypertension, abnormal renal function, constipation, diarrhea, headache, abdominal pain, insomnia, nausea, hypomagnesemia, urinary tract infection, hypophosphatemia, peripheral edema, asthenia, pain, hyperlipidemia, hyperkalemia, and anemia. Based on reported adverse reactions terms related to decreased renal function, nephrotoxicity was reported in approximately 52% of kidney transplantation patients.
Liver Transplant: The most common adverse reactions (≥ 40%) were tremor, headache, diarrhea, hypertension, nausea, abnormal renal function, abdominal pain, insomnia, paresthesia, anemia, pain, fever, asthenia, hyperkalemia, hypomagnesemia, and hyperglycemia. Based on reported adverse reactions terms related to decreased renal function, nephrotoxicity was reported in approximately 40% and 36% of liver transplantation patients receiving PROGRAF in the U.S. and European randomized trials.
Heart Transplant: The most common adverse reactions (≥ 15%) were abnormal renal function, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, CMV infection, tremor, hyperglycemia, leukopenia, infection, anemia, bronchitis, pericardial effusion, urinary tract infection and hyperlipemia. Based on reported adverse reactions terms related to decreased renal function, nephrotoxicity was reported in approximately 59% of heart transplantation patients in the European trial.

SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy:

Risk Summary
Tacrolimus can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Data from postmarketing surveillance and Transplantation Pregnancy Registry International (TPRI) suggest that infants exposed to tacrolimus in utero are at a risk of prematurity, birth defects/congenital anomalies, low birth weight, and fetal distress. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus. PROGRAF may increase hyperglycemia in pregnant women with diabetes (including gestational diabetes). Monitor maternal blood glucose levels regularly. PROGRAF may exacerbate hypertension in pregnant women and increase pre-eclampsia. Monitor and control blood pressure. Renal dysfunction, transient neonatal hyperkalemia and low birth weight have been reported at the time of delivery in infants of mothers taking PROGRAF. There is an increased risk for premature delivery (< 37 weeks) following transplantation and maternal exposure to PROGRAF.

Lactation:

Risk Summary
Controlled lactation studies have not been conducted in humans; however, tacrolimus has been reported to be present in human milk. The effects of tacrolimus on the breastfed infant, or on milk production have not been assessed.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential: PROGRAF can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise female and male patients of reproductive potential to speak to their healthcare provider on family planning options including appropriate contraception prior to starting treatment with PROGRAF.

Pediatric Use: The safety and effectiveness of PROGRAF have been established in pediatric liver, kidney, and heart transplant patients.

Hepatic/Renal Impaired Patients: Patients should be administered the lowest recommended starting dose, with close monitoring of tacrolimus trough concentrations and renal function, and appropriate dosage adjustments.

PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, INCLUDING BOXED WARNING, FOR PROGRAF.

 

 


INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ASTAGRAF XL

ASTAGRAF XL® (tacrolimus extended-release capsules)


Indication:

ASTAGRAF XL is indicated for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in kidney transplant patients in combination with other immunosuppressants in adult and pediatric patients.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING – MALIGNANCIES AND SERIOUS INFECTIONS IN TRANSPLANT PATIENTS; and INCREASED MORTALITY IN FEMALE LIVER TRANSPLANT PATIENTS

  • Increased risk for developing serious infections and malignancies with ASTAGRAF XL or other immunosuppressants that may lead to hospitalization or death.
  • Increased mortality in female liver transplant patients with ASTAGRAF XL. ASTAGRAF XL is not approved for use in liver transplantation.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

ASTAGRAF XL is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to tacrolimus.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Lymphoma and Other Malignancies

Immunosuppressants, including ASTAGRAF XL, increase the risk of developing lymphomas and other malignancies, particularly of the skin. The risk appears to be related to the intensity and duration of immunosuppression rather than to the use of any specific agent. Examine patients for skin changes and advise to avoid or limit exposure to sunlight and UV light by wearing protective clothing and using a sunscreen with a high protection factor.

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), has been reported in immunosuppressed organ transplant patients. The risk of PTLD appears greatest in patients who are EBV seronegative, a population which includes many young children. Monitor EBV serology during treatment.

Serious Infections

Immunosuppressants, including ASTAGRAF XL, increase the risk of developing bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoal infections, including opportunistic infections. These infections may lead to serious, including fatal, outcomes. Serious viral infections reported include:

  • Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (especially due to BK virus infection)
  • JC virus-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections: CMV seronegative transplant patients who receive an organ from a CMV seropositive donor are at highest risk of CMV viremia and CMV disease.

Monitor for the development of infection and adjust the immunosuppressive regimen to balance the risk of rejection with the risk of infection.

Increased Mortality in Female Liver Transplant Patients

In a liver transplant study, mortality at 12 months was higher among female patients treated with ASTAGRAF XL compared to female patients treated with tacrolimus immediate-release product. ASTAGRAF XL is not approved for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in patients who received a liver transplant.

Not Interchangeable with Other Tacrolimus Products – Medication Errors

Medication errors, including substitution and dispensing errors, between tacrolimus immediate-release products and ASTAGRAF XL (tacrolimus extended-release capsules) were reported outside the U.S. This led to serious adverse reactions, including graft rejection, or other adverse reactions due to under- or over-exposure to tacrolimus. ASTAGRAF XL is not substitutable for tacrolimus extended-release tablets or tacrolimus immediate-release capsules and tacrolimus for oral suspension. Instruct patients and caregivers to recognize the appearance of ASTAGRAF XL capsules and to confirm with the healthcare provider if a different product is dispensed or if dosing instructions have changed.

New Onset Diabetes After Transplant

ASTAGRAF XL caused new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) in kidney transplant patients, which may be reversible in some patients. African-American and Hispanic kidney transplant patients are at an increased risk. Monitor blood glucose concentrations and treat appropriately.

Nephrotoxicity due to ASTAGRAF XL and Drug Interactions

ASTAGRAF XL, like other calcineurin-inhibitors, can cause acute or chronic nephrotoxicity. Consider dosage reduction in patients with elevated serum creatinine and tacrolimus whole blood trough concentrations greater than the recommended range.

The risk for nephrotoxicity may increase when ASTAGRAF XL is concomitantly administered with CYP3A inhibitors (by increasing tacrolimus whole blood concentrations) or drugs associated with nephrotoxicity (e.g., aminoglycosides, ganciclovir, amphotericin B, cisplatin, nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors). Monitor renal function and consider dosage reduction if nephrotoxicity occurs.

Neurotoxicity

ASTAGRAF XL may cause a spectrum of neurotoxicities. The most severe neurotoxicities include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), delirium, seizure and coma; others include tremors, paresthesias, headache, mental status changes, and changes in motor and sensory functions. As symptoms may be associated with tacrolimus whole blood trough concentrations at or above the recommended range, monitor for neurologic symptoms and consider dosage reduction or discontinuation of ASTAGRAF XL if neurotoxicity occurs.

Hyperkalemia

Mild to severe hyperkalemia, which may require treatment, has been reported with tacrolimus including ASTAGRAF XL. Concomitant use of agents associated with hyperkalemia (e.g., potassium-sparing diuretics, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers) may increase the risk for hyperkalemia. Monitor serum potassium levels periodically during treatment.

Hypertension

Hypertension is a common adverse effect of ASTAGRAF XL and may require antihypertensive therapy. Some antihypertensive drugs can increase the risk for hyperkalemia. Calcium-channel blocking agents may increase tacrolimus blood concentrations and require dosage reduction of ASTAGRAF XL.

Risk of Rejection with Strong CYP3A Inducers and Risk of Serious Adverse Reactions with Strong CYP3A Inhibitors

The concomitant use of strong CYP3A inducers may increase the metabolism of tacrolimus, leading to lower whole blood trough concentrations and greater risk of rejection. In contrast, the concomitant use of strong CYP3A inhibitors may decrease the metabolism of tacrolimus, leading to higher whole blood trough concentrations and greater risk of serious adverse reactions (e.g., neurotoxicity, QT prolongation). Therefore, adjust ASTAGRAF XL dose and monitor tacrolimus whole blood trough concentrations when coadministering ASTAGRAF XL with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., including but not limited to telaprevir, boceprevir, ritonavir, ketoconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, clarithromycin) or strong CYP3A inducers (e.g., including but not limited to rifampin, rifabutin).

QT Prolongation

ASTAGRAF XL may prolong the QT/QTc interval and may cause Torsade de Pointes. Avoid ASTAGRAF XL in patients with congenital long QT syndrome. Consider obtaining electrocardiograms and monitoring electrolytes (magnesium, potassium, calcium) periodically during treatment in patients with congestive heart failure, bradyarrhythmias, those taking certain antiarrhythmic medications or other products that lead to QT prolongation, and those with electrolyte disturbances such as hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or hypomagnesemia.

When coadministering ASTAGRAF XL with other substrates and/or inhibitors of CYP3A, especially those that also have the potential to prolong the QT interval, a reduction in ASTAGRAF XL dosage, monitoring of tacrolimus whole blood concentrations, and monitoring for QT prolongation is recommended.

Immunizations

Whenever possible, administer the complete complement of vaccines before transplantation and treatment with ASTAGRAF XL. Avoid the use of live attenuated vaccines during treatment with ASTAGRAF XL (e.g., intranasal influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, oral polio, BCG, yellow fever, varicella and TY21a typhoid vaccines). Inactivated vaccines noted to be safe for administration after transplantation may not be sufficiently immunogenic during treatment with ASTAGRAF XL.

Pure Red Cell Aplasia

Cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported in patients treated with tacrolimus. All of these patients reported risk factors for PRCA such as parvovirus B19 infection, underlying disease, or concomitant medications associated with PRCA. A mechanism for tacrolimus-induced PRCA has not been elucidated. If PRCA is diagnosed, consider discontinuation of ASTAGRAF XL.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Kidney transplant patients through one year post-transplant: The most common adverse reactions (≥ 30%) were diarrhea (45%), constipation (40%), nausea (36%), peripheral edema (36%), tremor (35%), and anemia (33%).

Pediatrics
De novo pediatric transplant patients started on 0.3 mg/kg daily of tacrolimus product, given once daily for ASTAGRAF XL and divided into two doses for PROGRAF. Thirteen (13) pediatric patients completed 52 weeks on ASTAGRAF XL. The most common adverse reactions were diarrhea [7/13 (54%)], increased blood creatinine [6/13 (46%)], hypertension [3/13 (23%)], cough [4/13 (31%)], and upper respiratory tract infection [4/13 (31%)].

Stable pediatric allograft recipients 5 to 16 years of age were converted 1:1 (mg:mg) from PROGRAF to ASTAGRAF XL. Seventy-six (76) pediatric patients completed at least one year of ASTAGRAF XL-based treatment. The most common adverse reactions were diarrhea (13.9%), headache (13.9%), and cough (11.4%).

SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy:

Risk Summary
Tacrolimus can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Data from postmarketing surveillance and Transplantation Pregnancy Registry International (TPRI) suggest that infants exposed to tacrolimus in utero are at a risk of prematurity, birth defects/congenital anomalies, low birth weight, and fetal distress. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus. ASTAGRAF XL may increase hyperglycemia in pregnant women with diabetes (including gestational diabetes). Monitor maternal blood glucose levels regularly. ASTAGRAF XL may exacerbate hypertension in pregnant women and increase pre-eclampsia. Monitor and control blood pressure. Renal dysfunction, transient neonatal hyperkalemia and low birth weight have been reported at the time of delivery in infants of mothers taking ASTAGRAF XL. There is an increased risk for premature delivery (< 37 weeks) following transplantation and maternal exposure to ASTAGRAF XL.

Lactation:

Risk Summary
Controlled lactation studies have not been conducted in humans, however, tacrolimus has been reported to be present in human milk. The effects of tacrolimus on the breastfed infant, or on milk production have not been assessed.

Females and Males of Reproductive Potential: ASTAGRAF XL can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. Advise female and male patients of reproductive potential to speak to their healthcare provider on family planning options including appropriate contraception prior to starting treatment with ASTAGRAF XL.

Pediatric Use: The safety and effectiveness of ASTAGRAF XL in pediatric kidney transplant patients have been established. Use of ASTAGRAF XL in pediatric kidney transplant patients is based on adequate and well-controlled studies of ASTAGRAF XL in adult kidney transplant patients and supported by pharmacokinetic and safety data of ASTAGRAF XL in pediatric transplant patients 4 years of age and older who are able to swallow capsules intact.

Hepatic/Renal Impaired Patients: Patients should be administered the lowest recommended starting dose, with close monitoring of tacrolimus trough concentrations and renal function, and appropriate dosage adjustments.

Race: African-American patients may need to be titrated to higher dosages to attain comparable trough concentrations compared to Caucasian patients.

PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION, INCLUDING BOXED WARNING, FOR ASTAGRAF XL.

 

 


What is PROGRAF?


PROGRAF is a prescription medicine used with other medicines to help prevent organ rejection in people who have had a kidney, liver, or heart transplant.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION


What is the most important information I should know about PROGRAF?

PROGRAF can cause serious side effects, including:

  1. Increased risk of cancer. People who take PROGRAF have an increased risk of getting some kinds of cancer, including skin and lymph gland cancer (lymphoma).
  2. Increased risk of infection. PROGRAF is a medicine that affects your immune system. PROGRAF can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections can happen in people receiving PROGRAF that can cause death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any symptoms of an infection, including:
    • Fever
    • sweats or chills
    • cough or flu-like symptoms
    • muscle aches
    • warm, red, or painful areas on your skin

Do not take PROGRAF if you are allergic to tacrolimus or any of the ingredients in PROGRAF.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking PROGRAF?

Before you take PROGRAF, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • plan to receive any live vaccines (people taking PROGRAF should not receive live vaccines)
  • have or have had liver, kidney or heart problems
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. PROGRAF can harm your unborn baby.
    • If you are able to become pregnant, you should use effective birth control before and during treatment with PROGRAF. Talk to your healthcare provider before starting treatment with PROGRAF about birth control methods that may be right for you.
    • Males who have female partners who are able to become pregnant should also use effective birth control before and during treatment with PROGRAF. Talk to your healthcare provider before starting treatment with PROGRAF about birth control methods that may be right for you.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. PROGRAF passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will breastfeed while taking PROGRAF.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, and when you start a new medicine or stop taking a medicine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines; vitamins; natural, herbal or nutritional supplements. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take:

  • sirolimus (RAPAMUNE®)
  • cyclosporine (GENGRAF®, NEORAL®, and SANDIMMUNE®)
  • amphotericin B (ABELCET®, AMBISOME®)
  • cisplatin
  • antiviral medicines called nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors
  • antiviral medicines called protease inhibitors
  • water pill (diuretic)
  • medicine to treat high blood pressure
  • nelfinavir (VIRACEPT®)
  • telaprevir (INCIVEK®)
  • boceprevir
  • medicines called aminoglycosides that are used to treat bacterial infections
  • ganciclovir (CYTOVENE® IV, VALCYTE®)
  • ritonavir (KALETRA®, NORVIR®, TECHNIVIE, VIEKIRA PAK®, VIEKIRA XR)
  • ketoconazole
  • itraconazole (ONMEL®, SPORANOX®)
  • voriconazole (VFEND®)
  • clarithromycin (BIAXIN®, BIAXIN® XL, PREVPAC®)
  • rifampin (RIFADIN®, RIFAMATE®, RIFATER®, RIMACTANE®)
  • rifabutin (MYCOBUTIN®)
  • amiodarone (NEXTERONE®, PACERONE®)

Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure if you take any of the medicines listed above. PROGRAF may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how PROGRAF works. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

How Should I Take PROGRAF?

  • Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while taking PROGRAF.
  • Take PROGRAF exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • Your healthcare provider may change your PROGRAF dose if needed. Do not stop taking or change your dose of PROGRAF without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Take PROGRAF with or without food, the same way every day. For example, if you choose to take PROGRAF with food, you should always take PROGRAF with food.
  • Take PROGRAF at the same time each day, 12 hours apart. For example, if you take your first dose at 7:00 a.m., you should take your second dose at 7:00 p.m. Taking PROGRAF at the same time each day helps to keep the amount of medicine in your body at a steady level.
  • If you take too much PROGRAF, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

PROGRAF capsules:

  • Do not open or crush PROGRAF capsules.

PROGRAF Granules:

  • Children who have trouble swallowing capsules can be given PROGRAF Granules.
  • Give the dose of PROGRAF Granules right after preparing. Do not save prepared PROGRAF Granules as a liquid to take at a later time.
  • See the Instructions for Use at the end of the Patient Information for detailed instructions about how to mix and give PROGRAF Granules as a liquid.
  • If you get the granules, or prepared oral suspension on your skin, wash the area well with soap and water.
  • If you get the granules, or prepared oral suspension in your eyes, rinse with plain water.

What should I avoid while taking PROGRAF?

  • While you take PROGRAF you should not receive any live vaccines.
  • Limit the amount of time you spend in sunlight and avoid exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, such as tanning machines. Wear protective clothing and use a sunscreen with a high sun protection factor (SPF).

PROGRAF may cause serious side effects, including:

  • problems from medicine errors. People who take PROGRAF have sometimes been given the wrong type of tacrolimus product. Tacrolimus extended-release medicines are not the same as PROGRAF capsules or granules and cannot be substituted for each other, unless specifically prescribed by your healthcare provider, who will send you to get blood tacrolimus levels at a lab. Check your PROGRAF when you get a new prescription and before you take it to make sure you have received PROGRAF capsules or PROGRAF Granules. Check with the pharmacist and call your healthcare provider if you think you were given the wrong medicine.

  • high blood sugar (diabetes). Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check for diabetes. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any symptoms of high blood sugar, including:

    • frequent urination
    • increased thirst or hunger
    • blurred vision
    • confusion
    • drowsiness
    • loss of appetite
    • fruity smell on your breath
    • nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain
  • kidney problems. Kidney problems are a serious and common side effect of PROGRAF. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your kidney function.

  • nervous system problems. Nervous system problems are a serious and common side effect of PROGRAF. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these symptoms that could be signs of a serious nervous system problem:

    • headache
    • confusion
    • seizures
    • changes in your vision
    • changes in behavior
    • coma
    • tremors
    • numbness and tingling
  • high levels of potassium in your blood. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your potassium level.

  • high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a serious and common side effect of PROGRAF. Your healthcare provider will monitor your blood pressure and may prescribe blood pressure medicine for you, if needed. Your healthcare provider may instruct you to check your blood pressure at home.

  • changes in the electrical activity of your heart (QT prolongation).

  • heart problems (myocardial hypertrophy). Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these symptoms of heart problems:

    • shortness of breath
    • chest pain
    • feel lightheaded
    • feel faint
  • severe low red blood cell count (anemia).

The most common side effects of PROGRAF in people who have received a kidney, liver or heart transplant are:

  • infections in general, including cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • stomach pain
  • trouble sleeping
  • nausea
  • high blood sugar (diabetes)
  • low levels of magnesium in your blood
  • low levels of phosphate in your blood
  • swelling of the hands, legs, ankles, or feet
  • weakness
  • tremors (shaking of the body)
  • constipation
  • pain
  • high levels of fat in your blood
  • high levels of potassium in your blood
  • low red blood cell count (anemia)
  • low white blood cell count
  • fever
  • numbness or tingling in your hands and feet
  • inflammation of your airway (bronchitis)
  • fluid around your heart

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of PROGRAF. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects.

General information about the safe and effective use of PROGRAF.

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use PROGRAF for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give PROGRAF to other people, even if they have the same symptoms that you have. It may harm them. You can ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for information about PROGRAF that is written for health professionals.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

Please see the Patient Information and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning, for PROGRAF.


What is ASTAGRAF XL?


ASTAGRAF XL is a prescription medicine used with other medicines to help prevent organ rejection in people who have had a kidney transplant. ASTAGRAF XL is an extended-release capsule and is not the same as tacrolimus immediate-release capsules, tacrolimus for oral suspension or tacrolimus extended-release tablets. Your healthcare provider should decide what medicine is right for you.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION


What is the most important information I should know about ASTAGRAF XL?

ASTAGRAF XL can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Increased risk of cancer. People who take ASTAGRAF XL have an increased risk of getting some kinds of cancer, including skin and lymph gland cancer (lymphoma).

  • Increased risk of infection. ASTAGRAF XL is a medicine that affects your immune system. ASTAGRAF XL can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. Serious infections can happen in people receiving ASTAGRAF XL that can cause death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have symptoms of an infection such as:

    • fever
    • sweats or chills
    • cough or flu-like symptoms
    • muscle aches
    • warm, red or painful areas on your skin
  • Increased risk of death in females who have had a liver transplant. You should not take ASTAGRAF XL if you have had a liver transplant without talking to your healthcare provider.

Who should not take ASTAGRAF XL?

Do not take ASTAGRAF XL if you are allergic to tacrolimus or any of the ingredients in ASTAGRAF XL.

Before you take ASTAGRAF XL tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • plan to receive any live vaccines.
  • have or have had liver, kidney or heart problems, or have any other medical conditions.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. ASTAGRAF XL may harm your unborn baby.
    • If you are able to become pregnant, you should use effective birth control before and during treatment with ASTAGRAF XL. Talk to your healthcare provider before starting treatment with ASTAGRAF XL about birth control methods that may be right for you.
    • Males who have female partners who are able to become pregnant should also use effective birth control before and during treatment with ASTAGRAF XL. Talk to your healthcare provider before starting treatment with ASTAGRAF XL about birth control methods that may be right for you.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. ASTAGRAF XL passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will breastfeed while taking ASTAGRAF XL.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, natural, herbal or nutritional supplements. ASTAGRAF XL may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how ASTAGRAF XL works.

How should I take ASTAGRAF XL?

  • Take ASTAGRAF XL exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • Your healthcare provider may change your dose if needed. Do not stop taking or change your dose of ASTAGRAF XL without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Take ASTAGRAF XL capsules whole. Do not break, crush, chew or dissolve ASTAGRAF XL capsules before swallowing. If you cannot swallow ASTAGRAF XL capsules whole, tell your healthcare provider.
  • Take ASTAGRAF XL at the same time each morning, preferably on an empty stomach at least one hour before, or at least two hours after, you have eaten a meal.
  • If you miss your dose of ASTAGRAF XL, it should be taken as soon as possible, but no longer than 14 hours after your regularly scheduled time. If it is longer than 14 hours, the missed dose should be skipped and the next dose should be taken the following morning at your regularly scheduled time. Do not take two doses at the same time.
  • If you take too much ASTAGRAF XL, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

What should I avoid while taking ASTAGRAF XL?

  • Live vaccines such as flu vaccine through your nose, measles, mumps, rubella, polio by mouth, TB vaccine, yellow fever, chicken pox or typhoid.
  • Exposure to sunlight and UV light such as tanning machines. Wear protective clothing and use a sunscreen.
  • You should not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while taking ASTAGRAF XL.
  • You should not drink alcohol when taking ASTAGRAF XL.

What are the possible side effects of ASTAGRAF XL?

ASTAGRAF XL may cause serious side effects, including:

  • See "What is the most important information I should know about ASTAGRAF XL?"

  • Problems from medication errors such as graft rejection and other serious reactions. People who take ASTAGRAF XL have sometimes been given the wrong medicine, because some medicines have the same ingredient (tacrolimus) as ASTAGRAF XL. Serious reactions have happened including graft rejection. Check your ASTAGRAF XL when you get a new prescription to make sure you have received the right medicine.

    • Call your healthcare provider right away if you think you were given the wrong medicine
    • Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure what ASTAGRAF XL should look like.
  • high blood sugar (diabetes). Your healthcare provider may do certain tests to check for diabetes. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have:

    • frequent urination
    • increased thirst or hunger
    • blurred vision
    • confusion
    • drowsiness
    • loss of appetite
    • fruity smell on your breath
    • nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain
  • kidney problems. Kidney problems are serious and common side effects of ASTAGRAF XL. Your healthcare provider may do certain tests to check your kidney function while you take ASTAGRAF XL.

  • nervous system problems. Nervous system problems are a serious and common side effect of ASTAGRAF XL. Call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away if you get any of these symptoms while taking ASTAGRAF XL. These could be signs of serious nervous system problems:

    • confusion
    • changes in alertness
    • muscle tremors
    • numbness and tingling
    • headache
    • seizures
    • vision changes
  • high levels of potassium in your blood. Your healthcare provider may do certain tests to check your potassium level while you take ASTAGRAF XL.

  • high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a serious and common side effect of ASTAGRAF XL. Your healthcare provider will monitor your blood pressure and may ask you to check your blood pressure at home.

  • changes in the electrical activity of your heart (QT prolongation).

  • Severe low blood cell count (anemia).

The most common side effects of ASTAGRAF XL are diarrhea, constipation, nausea, swelling of the hands, ankles or legs, and tremors (shaking of the body).

These are not all the possible side effects of ASTAGRAF XL. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

Please see the accompanying Medication Guide and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.



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Diet Tips for Transplant Recipients

Good nutrition is important after a transplant. Not only can it help you control your weight, but it can also help you lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, and maintain healthy blood sugar levels.

It’s important that you work with your transplant team to create a healthy diet. Your dietitian will likely give you specific instructions and a meal plan. Some things your dietitian may recommend are listed below.

Eat a Well-Balanced Diet


You may have fewer dietary restrictions than you did before your transplant. However, your transplant team will likely encourage you to eat a balanced diet that includes a variety of highly nutritious foods such as:

Fruits and vegetables
Whole grains
Lean meat, poultry,
fish, eggs
Nuts
Beans

Keep Healthy Foods on Hand


You may want to keep your kitchen stocked with healthy foods for meals and snacks, such as:

  • Fresh raw vegetables for snacking, such as carrots, celery, and peppers
  • Lots of fresh vegetables for cooking, such as tomatoes, mushrooms, broccoli, chard, spinach, onions, and garlic
  • Fruits in moderation, such as strawberries, oranges, melons, and apples
  • Canned beans, such as red kidney beans and black beans
  • Frozen vegetables, like peas, artichokes, green beans, and broccoli
  • Low-fat or non-fat dairy products, like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt
  • Unsalted nuts
  • Herbs such as oregano, parsley, and thyme, instead of salt

Avoid Trans Fats and Sodium


Saturated fats and trans fats are found in fried foods, and snack foods such as chips, cookies, donuts, and crackers. These foods may increase your cholesterol. Cholesterol can build up in the walls of your heart and cause heart disease.

Your transplant team may also ask you to limit salt as part of a healthy diet. Sodium, the main component in salt, may contribute to high blood pressure.

Consider substituting salt with different spices and staying away from foods that are salty, such as packaged snacks (potato chips, salted nuts, pretzels), canned soups, hot dogs, cured meats (ham and deli meats), and other high-sodium foods and condiments (soy sauce).

Other Foods to Avoid


When preparing meals, it is important to wash your hands, food, and work surfaces to avoid germs. Be sure to chill food properly. Also, cook food thoroughly to kill harmful bacteria that might make you sick. Some foods may not be safe to eat. Your transplant team may tell you to avoid foods such as:

  • Raw eggs and foods containing raw eggs (eg, Caesar dressing)
  • Raw or undercooked meat or seafood
  • Unpasteurized milk, juice, or cider
  • Soft cheeses made with unpasteurized milk

Healthy Recipes


You know that good nutrition is an important part of staying healthy. Your transplant team may recommend a high-protein, low-fat, low-cholesterol, and low-sodium diet. Try some of these delicious recipes for eating right without skimping on flavor.

Click on the recipes below to view.

Chicken, Endive, and Blueberry
Salad With Toasted Pecans

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 151
Protein: 13.8 g

Sodium: 368 mg
Fat: 5.2 g

Carbohydrates: 13 g
Cholesterol: 34 mg

Ingredients

  • 4 cups sliced Belgian endive (about 2 large heads)
  • 1 cup gourmet salad greens
  • 1-1/2 cups chopped roasted skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • 1 cup fresh blueberries
  • 2-1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2-1/2 tablespoons honey
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup (2 ounces) crumbled goat cheese
  • 2 tablespoons chopped pecans, toasted

Directions

In a large bowl, combine the first 4 ingredients. Combine vinegar, honey, salt, and pepper. Stir the mixture with a whisk. Add dressing to endive mixture, toss gently, and sprinkle with cheese and pecans.

Summer Radish Salad

Serves 6

Nutritional Information

Calories: 46
Protein: 0.8 g

Sodium: 49 mg
Fat: 2.6 g

Carbohydrates: 5 g

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons raw chives, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, dried or fresh
  • 1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
  • 4 cups radishes, sliced

Directions

Mix all ingredients together well and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Baked French Fries

Serves 5

Nutritional Information

Calories: 93
Carbohydrates: 15 g

Fat: 5.2 g

Protein: 2 g

Ingredients

  • 2 large potatoes
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon paprika

Directions

Preheat oven to 450ºF.

Peel potatoes and cut into slices 4 inches long and 1/4 inch wide; place in a bowl of ice water to crisp. Just before cooking, turn potatoes onto paper towel and pat dry. Spread potatoes in one layer in a shallow baking pan; sprinkle potatoes with the vegetable oil, shaking the pan to spread oil evenly over potatoes.

Bake 30 to 40 minutes, turning frequently, until golden brown. Empty potatoes onto paper towels; sprinkle with salt and paprika.

Pasta Primavera

Serves 6

Nutritional Information

Calories: 273
Fat: 3 g

Protein: 13 g
Sodium: 115 mg

Carbohydrates: 48 g
Cholesterol: 6 mg

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces uncooked pasta (6 cups cooked)
  • 12-ounce bag frozen mixed vegetables
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 14-ounce can low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup half and half or nondairy creamer
  • 2 tablespoons flour

Directions

Cook pasta and vegetables in separate pots according to package directions. Drain. Pour low-sodium chicken broth in a medium-sized stockpot and place over low heat. Add flour to broth, whisking vigorously to avoid clumps from forming. Add half and half or nondairy creamer.

Simmer on low heat for 5 to 10 minutes until mixture thickens slightly. Stir occasionally while simmering. Add cooked vegetables and pasta. Cook until heated through. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and serve.

Orzo With Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Mushrooms

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 122
Fat: 3.7 g

Protein: 5.4 g
Sodium: 72 mg

Carbohydrates: 23.5 g

Ingredients

  • 2 sun-dried tomatoes (not packed in oil)
  • Olive oil cooking spray
  • 1-1/2 cups mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/4 cup green onions and tops, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons dry sherry (optional)
  • 1/2 cup (4 ounces) orzo, cooked, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons fresh (or 1 teaspoon dried) rosemary leaves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Directions

Place sun-dried tomatoes in small bowl; pour hot water over to cover.

Let tomatoes stand until softened, about 15 minutes; drain and slice. Spray large skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium heat. Sauté mushrooms, green onions, and garlic until mushrooms are tender, 5 to 7 minutes.

Add chicken broth and sherry to skillet; heat to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until liquid is reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Cool to room temperature.

Combine orzo and mushroom mixture in bowl; add tomatoes and remaining ingredients and toss.

Broiled Salmon With Maple-Mustard Glaze

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 484.8
Carbohydrates: 0.5 g

Protein: 46.4 g

Fat: 30.4 g

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup sugar-free pancake syrup
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
  • 2 garlic cloves, pushed through a press
  • 2 pounds of salmon filet

Directions

To ensure even cooking, buy salmon cuts from the middle of the fillet, not the narrow tail end. When portions are the same thickness, they cook evenly.

In a small, heavy saucepan, combine syrup, water, mustard, and garlic, and simmer until reduced to about 1/2 cup. Let cool.

Heat broiler. Arrange salmon, skin side down, on oiled rack of broiler pan. Broil salmon 4 inches from heat source for 6 minutes. Brush with sauce and broil until just cooked through, about 4 minutes more.

Fish With Chinese Ginger Scallion Sauce

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 180
Fat: 9 g

Protein: 23 g
Carbohydrates: 3 g

Sodium: 210 mg

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1-1/2 cups thinly sliced scallions, white and green parts
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
  • Freshly ground pepper, preferably white, to taste
  • Cooking spray
  • 4 (4-ounce) pieces tilapia or other mild, flaky white fish

Directions

Preheat the broiler.

Heat oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Mix in scallions to coat them with oil. Add ginger, sugar, and salt. Cook, stirring until sugar dissolves and scallions are tender but still bright green, 3-4 minutes. Turn off the heat and mix in the zest. Season sauce generously with pepper. Set skillet aside so it keeps warm while the fish cooks.

Arrange fish on a baking sheet and coat with cooking spray. Season fish lightly with salt and ground pepper. Broil until fish is opaque in the center at the thickest point, about 6 minutes. Divide fish among 4 dinner plates. Top each piece with a quarter of the sauce. Serve immediately.

Turkey Breast With Honey-Mustard Glaze

Serves 10

Nutritional Information

Calories: 190
Fat: 1 g

Protein: 35 g
Carbohydrates: 8 g

Sodium: 260 mg
Cholesterol: 90 mg

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil spray
  • 1 4- to 6-pound turkey breast, fresh or thawed
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon-style mustard

Directions

Preheat oven to 325°F.

Season interior and exterior of turkey breast with salt and pepper. In a 13 in x 9 in x 2 in roasting pan, place turkey breast on a V-shaped rack. Roast uncovered for 1-1/4 to 2 hours, or until meat thermometer registers 165°F in the deepest part of breast.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine honey and mustard. Brush glaze over breast during final 20 minutes of cooking. Remove from oven and allow turkey breast to stand for 10 minutes before carving.

Caribbean Chicken

Serves 6

Nutritional Information

Calories: 160
Fat: 6 g

Protein: 19 g
Sodium: 44 mg

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons oil
  • 6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (24 ounces raw weight), sliced into half-inch strips
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup peach or apricot chutney (fruit-sweetened)
  • 1/2 teaspoon each thyme, curry powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1-1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons dry white wine
  • 2 teaspoons coconut flavoring

Directions

In a large skillet, heat oil to medium high, and sauté chicken pieces until brown. Remove chicken, set aside. Sauté garlic and onion in skillet until soft and golden.

Stir in chutney and spices and cook 1 minute. Add broth and wine, and heat through, stirring constantly. Return chicken to sauce, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in coconut flavoring.

Serve over hot rice.

Jamaican Jerk Chicken Kabobs

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 181
Fat: 5 g

Protein: 27 g
Sodium: 525 mg

Carbohydrates: 6 g
Cholesterol: 66 mg

Ingredients

  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 1 jalapeño chili, seeded and minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, cut into 12 pieces
  • 1 red pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 green pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces

Directions

In blender or in food processor with knife blade attached, process green onions, jalapeño, ginger, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, allspice, thyme, 2 teaspoons of the oil, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt until paste forms.

Place chicken in small bowl or in a resealable plastic bag and add green onion mixture, turning to coat chicken. Cover bowl or seal bag and refrigerate chicken 1 hour to marinate.

Meanwhile, in small bowl, toss red and green peppers with remaining 1 teaspoon oil and remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt. Assemble kabobs and place on rack in broiling pan. Brush kabobs with any remaining marinade.

Place pan in broiler at closest position to heat source. Broil kabobs 5 minutes; turn and broil until chicken loses its pink color throughout, about 5 minutes longer.

Grilled Chicken With Arugula and Lemon Vinaigrette

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 170
Fat: 5 g

Protein: 27 g
Sodium: 390 mg

Carbohydrates: 4 g

Ingredients

  • 4 packed cups baby arugula leaves
  • 2 packed cups baby spinach leaves
  • 6 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 pound skinless and boneless chicken breast, cut into 4 pieces
  • Cooking spray, preferably olive oil

Directions

Heat grill to medium-high heat. If using a ridged grill pan indoors, set over high heat until very hot.

In a large mixing bowl, combine arugula and spinach. Cover and refrigerate. In a small bowl, whisk lemon juice and salt until salt dissolves. Add ground pepper and whisk in oil until combined. Set dressing aside.

One at a time, place each piece of chicken breast between two pieces of wax paper. Using the flat side of a meat mallet (or the bottom of a small, heavy skillet), pound chicken until evenly 1/8-inch thick. If the chicken pieces are thick, it may be necessary to turn them over and repeat pounding several times. Coat chicken lightly on both sides with cooking spray. If desired, season lightly with salt and pepper.

Grill chicken until white in center, turning it once, about 3 minutes each side. While chicken grills, pour dressing over greens. Using tongs, turn the greens until well coated. To serve, place one piece of chicken on each of 4 dinner plates. Mound a quarter of the salad on top of each.

Herb-Breaded Pork Chops

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 273
Fat: 15 g

Protein: 24 g
Sodium: 351 mg

Carbohydrates: 7 g

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil cooking spray
  • 1/4 cup garlic-herb breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon dried sage
  • 2 tablespoons low-fat or non-fat mayonnaise
  • 1 egg white
  • 4 boneless pork loin chops (3 to 4 ounces each)
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375ºF. Spray a 12-inch x 8-inch (2-quart) glass baking dish or shallow pan with cooking spray. In a shallow bowl, combine breadcrumbs, cheese, and sage. Mix well.

In another shallow bowl, combine mayonnaise and egg white and beat until smooth. Pour the flour into a third shallow bowl and dip each pork chop into it, tapping off any excess. Dip each pork chop into breadcrumb mixture, coating both sides. Place pork chops in the baking dish in a single layer. Spray each chop lightly with cooking spray.

Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until pork is no longer pink in the center.

Beef Teriyaki

Serves 4

Nutritional Information

Calories: 100
Fat: 3 g

Protein: 17 g
Sodium: 200 mg

Carbohydrates: 1 g

Ingredients

  • 1 pound boneless sirloin beef steak
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup dry sherry, white wine, or chicken broth
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh ginger root or 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon sugar or 1 teaspoon sugar substitute
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 5 kabob skewers

Directions

Trim fat from beef; cut beef into 3/4-inch cubes. Place beef in glass or plastic bowl. Mix remaining ingredients; pour over beef. Cover and refrigerate, stirring occasionally, at least 1 hour.

Thread 6 beef cubes on each of 5 skewers; brush with marinade. Set oven control to broil. Broil kabobs with tops about 4 inches from heat 5 to 6 minutes; turn. Brush with marinade; broil until done, 5 to 6 minutes longer. Brush with marinade.

Classic Pumpkin Pie

Serves 12

Nutritional Information

Calories: 222
Fat: 7.4 g

Protein: 4.1 g
Sodium: 241 mg

Carbohydrates: 35.3 g
Cholesterol: 32 mg

Ingredients

Filling:

  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1-3/4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 (12-ounce) can evaporated low-fat milk
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 (15-ounce) can unsweetened pumpkin

Crust:

  • 1/2 (15-ounce) package refrigerated pie dough (such as Pillsbury®)
  • Cooking spray

Topping:

  • 1/4 cup whipping cream
  • 1 tablespoon amaretto (almond-flavored liqueur) (optional)
  • 2 teaspoons powdered sugar

Directions

Place oven rack in lowest position. Preheat oven to 425°.

Filling: In a large bowl, combine first 6 ingredients, stirring with a whisk. Add pumpkin and continue to stir until smooth.

Crust: Roll dough to form an 11-inch circle and fit into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. Fold edges under and pinch edge of crust. Pour the prepared pumpkin mixture into the crust and place pie plate on a baking sheet. Place baking sheet on lowest oven rack and bake at 425° for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350° (do not remove pie from oven) and bake for an additional 50 minutes or until almost set. Let pie cool completely on wire rack.

Topping: With a mixer, beat cream at high speed until stiff peaks form. Add amaretto and powdered sugar. Beat until blended and serve with pie.

Not-So-Guilty Brownies

Serves 24

Nutritional Information

Calories: 80
Carbohydrates: 13 g

Sodium: 50 mg

Fat: 3g

Ingredients

Brownies:

  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 2 teaspoons chocolate extract or flavor
  • 2 eggs

Frosting:

  • 3/4 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa
  • 1 tablespoon skim or 2% milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon chocolate extract or flavor
  • 1/8 teaspoon butter flavor

Directions

Heat oven to 350°F.

Grease bottom only of 8-inch square pan. Combine all brownie ingredients in a medium bowl and mix well. Spread in greased pan.

Bake at 350°F for 13 to 18 minutes, or until top is dry and springs back when touched lightly in center. Cool for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, combine all frosting ingredients in a small bowl and mix well. Spread over top of slightly cooled brownies. Cool completely.

Chocolate Cheesecake

Serves 8

Nutritional Information

Calories: 176
Fat: 4 g

Protein: 11 g
Sodium: 140 mg

Carbohydrates: 22 g

Ingredients

Crust:

  • 3/4 cup graham cracker crumbs
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil or olive oil

Frosting:

  • 3 large egg whites
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 cups non-fat ricotta cheese
  • 1/4 cup powdered cocoa
  • 1/3 cup yogurt cheese
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

Part 1: Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray 8-inch springform pan with cooking spray. Fill a 13-inch x 9-inch x 2-inch pan halfway with hot water. Place in oven on shelf below where chocolate cheesecake will be placed. This will prevent the top of the cheesecake from cracking.

In a small bowl, combine all crust ingredients. Press onto bottom and partway up sides of springform pan. Set aside.

Part 2: In food processor or blender, combine egg whites, sugar, ricotta, cocoa, yogurt cheese, and vanilla; process, scraping sides occasionally, until smooth and thick (about 1 minute). Pour into crust.

Bake 30 to 35 minutes, until filling is just set (center will jiggle slightly). Turn off oven and leave cake in closed oven 5 minutes longer. Remove from oven and cool about an hour on wire rack. Cover and refrigerate at least 3 hours before serving.

Fresh Plum Tart

Serves 8

Nutritional Information

Calories: 208
Fat: 9 g

Protein: 3 g
Sodium: 166 mg

Cholesterol: 58 mg
Carbohydrates: 31 g

Ingredients

  • 1 refrigerated fill-and-bake pie crust
    (7 to 7-1/2 oz)
  • 4 ripe plums (about 1 pound total), peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 large eggs (or 1/2 cup egg substitute)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup fat-free sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Press the prepared pie crust into a 9-inch-diameter tart pan with a removable bottom. Press the crust against the fluted edge and trim off any pastry that extends over top. Discard any extra dough and trimmings (about 1 ounce). Bake the crust only 5 minutes, until it is set but not brown. Cool on a rack.

Arrange the plum slices in overlapping circles to cover the bottom of the tart shell.

In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs, sugar, fat-free sour cream, and flour until smooth. Pour the custard over the plums; it should fill the spaces between the plums.

Bake at 350°F for 18 to 20 minutes until the custard is set and the edges are slightly browned. Cool and cut into 8 equal slices.